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NSRI Pink is for Buoys Campaign

The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) is the charity organisation that saves lives on South African waters – both coastal and inland. Our goal is to prevent drowning through rescue operations, education and prevention initiatives. 

With many of our beaches opening up again, those heading back to our sandy shores may have noticed splashes of pink at some rivers, dams and on the beach. 

It is Sea Rescue’s new campaign to save lives on South African waters this summer season.  

The campaign “Pink is for Buoys” draws attention to the lifesaving Pink Rescue Buoys that the NSRI has deployed to strategic areas, next to rivers, dams and the ocean across South Africa.  

The campaign is a double entendre, it tackles two issues with one buoy.  

Firstly, it challenges perceptions that the colour pink is traditionally reserved for girls, and secondly, by introducing a new colour buoy, the NSRI is forcing us to pay attention to the danger of drowning.  

The pink buoys are part of a lifesaving water safety initiative by the NSRI. The distinctive pink colouring of the rescue buoy is designed to stand out in the water and provide emergency flotation. Pink buoys save lives.  

“The campaign aims to challenge our perceptions of the colour pink, to create awareness of the Pink Rescue Buoy project, as well as to encourage communities to treasure and protect the rescue buoys that have been donated to their communities,” said Andrew Ingram, Head of Drowning Prevention at the NSRI.  

Over 850 pink buoys have been installed and 68 lives have been saved using a Pink Rescue Buoy since the project’s inception in November 2017.  

The campaign has three key messages :  

  • Pink is for Buoys – The pink buoy initiative has saved countless lives. If someone is drowning, think pink.  
  • Missing Buoys – A stolen buoy is a stolen life  
  • Lost buoy, lost life – Always leave the pink buoys where they belong  

Hundreds of drownings in South Africa each year are preventable, if only proper education, prevention initiatives and the right equipment were at hand.  

“With the deployment of hundreds of Pink Rescue Buoys across South Africa, it is our hope that these lifesaving buoys will save lives on South African waters this summer season and for years to come,” said Andrew Ingram, Head of Drowning Prevention at the NSRI.  

“The success of the Pink Rescue Buoy project however depends on our communities.”   

Without communities standing behind the project and teaching children that the Pink Rescue Buoys should not be taken off their poles except in an emergency, we will not be able to save lives,” Andrew said.   

In some areas, Pink Rescue Buoys which were thought to have been stolen have been returned to their poles within days of the community leadership telling people that they must not take these emergency floats. As our Pink Rescue Buoy sign says – ‘Please return me so that we can save another life’.   

We urge community members to become pink lifesavers, by reporting any missing pink rescue buoys to our Emergency Operations Centre on 021 434 4011. Your report could save a life.  

Should you wish to sponsor a pink rescue buoy at a cost of R1500 per a buoy, or would like to volunteer and assist us in protecting and maintaining the buoys, please contact pinkrescuebuoys@searescue.org.za 

Duty Spokesperson
Email: jessica@searescue.org.za | Cell: 076 175 0663

                                                                                                                            

SEA RESCUE EMERGENCY:  087 094 9774 or 112  

 

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